Apache indian customs

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Apache indian customs

They had been held prisoner at Fort Sill, Oklahoma since the capture of the famed Apache Geronimo in 1886. All became members of the Mescalero Apache Tribe when it was reorganized in 1936 under the provisions of the Indian Organization Act. Today's Mescalero Apache Tribe is governed by a Tribal Council of eight. Geronimo (1829-1909) was an eminent figure of Bedonkohe Apache tribe. The name Geronimo means “the one who yawns.” He was given this name during the Apache wars in one of the battles against Mexico. and Mexico for many decades so that the Apache tribal lands could be expanded. In 1858 a group of Mexican soldiers attacked his village and killed his wife, mother and three children. It was then that he joined hands with others to respond to the killings. He made his name as a war chief who was notorious for raiding Mexican towns and provinces.

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Native Americans Apache Indian History and Culture Nde, Dine'e.

Apache indian customs

Please note that Apaches and other American Indians are living people with a present and a future as well as a past. Apache history is interesting and important, but the Apache Indians are still here today, too, and we try to feature modern writers as well as traditional folklore, contemporary art as well as museum pieces, and. Apache is the collective name for several culturally related tribes of Native Americans, aboriginal inhabitants of North America, who speak a Southern Athabaskan language. The modern term excludes the related Navajo people. It may derive from the Yavapai word epache, meaning "people". The origin has also been claimed to be the Zuni word apachu, meaning "enemy" (but this may have been the Zuni name for the Navajo people) or an unspecified Quechan word meaning "fighting-men". The Apaches formerly ranged over southeastern Arizona and north-western Mexico. The chief divisions of the Apaches were the Arivaipa, Chiricahua, Coyotero, Faraone Gileno, Llanero, Mescalero, Mimbreno, Mogollon, Naisha, Tchikun and Tchishi.

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Culture and Customs of the Apache Indians - Greenwood - ABC-CLIO

Apache indian customs

Culture and Customs of the Apache Indians. by Veronica E. Velarde Tiller. Understanding contemporary Apache culture requires an appreciation for the traditional Apache values of kinship and tribal solidarity, the history behind their time-honored ceremonies and festivals, and the issues and challenges that the Apache. A comprehensive illustrated guide to Native Indian Tribes of America with pictures and videos. The Native Indian Tribes include the Apache, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chinook, Comanche, Hopi and Sioux. Containing facts and information about United States Indian Tribes, Famous Native Americans, Houses, Food, Weapons, Symbols, Designs, Stories, Groups, Culture and Native American Indian names. A comprehensive and illustrated guide to Native Indian Tribes and the culture of the Native American and the indigenous people of North America. All of our articles are accompanied by pictures, paintings and many have videos - all bringing the life of Native Indian tribes to life and enabling a better understanding of each subject.

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Apache Language and the Apache Indian

Apache indian customs

Apache language information and introduction to the culture of the Apache Indians. Covers Western Apache including Chiricahua and Mescalero and Eastern Apache. Here are over 1400 of their stories and teachings, split over eight pages. I have 100's more Native American Legends to add, so please come back and revisit.

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Apache - Wikipedia

Apache indian customs

The Apache / ə ˈ p æ tʃ iː /; French are a group of culturally related Native American tribes in the Southwestern United States, which include the Chiricahua. By Jesus Carrasco The Ponderosa Pine Tree is a tree that is commonly found in the Southwest which is the home of many Apache tribes. This tree was used by the Apache in many aspects of their life. Many ponderosa pine trees were lost over time due to fires and other natural causes. Now many Apache groups and organizations today are still trying to replant the ponderosas that were lost. The Apache are trying to replant the ponderosa pine trees because they have an interdependent relationship with the land, recent events in history such as the settlers’ urbanization of Apache land have caused the ponderosa pine tree to decrease in number, and the Elk/Chino Well Fires caused the destruction of many ponderosa pine trees.

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Geronimo : His Own Story - The Old And The New - Religion

Apache indian customs

Check out this site for interesting facts about the Apache tribe. Food, clothing, homes, weapons, chiefs and culture of the Apache. Interesting facts about the Apache nation of the Southwest. Sometimes prone, sometimes supine, but always decumbent. According to this gentleman the Kiowas call themselves Kaw-a-wāh, the Comanches Nerm, and the Apaches Tāh-zee. They do not seem to have any particular rule with regard to the position. Given, physician to the Kiowa and Comanche Agency, Indian Territory, the following description of burial ceremonies was received. They select a place where the grave is easily prepared, which they do with such implements as they chance to have, viz, a squaw-axe, or hoe. If they are traveling, the grave is often very hastily prepared and not much time is spent in finishing. I was present at the burial of Black Hawk, an Apache chief, some two years ago, and took the body in my light wagon up the side of a mountain to the place of burial. They found a crevice in the rocks about four feet wide and three feet deep. By filling in loose rocks at either end they made a very nice tomb.

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CHAPTER I. INDIANS OF ARIZONA. - University of Arizona Libraries

Apache indian customs

They built roads through the Apache country, kept up a constant fight with the Indians, and paved the way to a great extent, as we shall see, for the subjugation of these tribes by General Crook. page 2. The following pages will give, as far as possible, the locations of the Indians, their habits, customs, and what can be. Camp of the Lipans, as depicted in an idyllic scene by Theodore Gentilz, 1840s. The artist lived in the Castro colonies, in present-day Medina County, where he surveyed land for new townsites. Although the Lipans and Comanches conducted brutal raids on the small communities, they generally spared Castroville, and Gentilz maintained a cordial relationship with the Lipans. —without a doubt, the name is one of the most evocative of all Indian groups, charged with history and popularized in books and movies. However, the name Apache is a generic one, applying to several tribes that have shared—but unique—histories. The Apache include groups that have been known at various times as Apachu, Lipan, Mescalero, Faraones, Gilenos, Natagee, Querechos, Tontos, Ypandi, and Yutaglen-ne, to name but a few.

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Apache Tribe History, Facts & Culture - Video & Lesson Transcript.

Apache indian customs

The Apache was never a unified political union. The very loose-knit organization of the Apache tribe caused many problems for them throughout history. It was very difficult for them to have good relations with the Spanish, Mexicans, Americans, or other Indian tribes. This was because one Apache band might make peace. & Wildlife Casino Resort Events Regional About Nation Biz Opportunity Businesses Culture Center Business Center ANCC Chamber Phone Directory Links Contact Nation Privacy Home Please visit the official website for the San Carlos Apache Cultural Center. The facility opened on September 12, 1995, located in Peridot, Arizona on Highway 70, at mile marker 272 on the north side. The Cultural Center serves the San Carlos Apache Reservation, home to over 15,000 members of various bands of Apache. We cherish these lands rich with history and lore, and are delighted to know that it has drawn your attention. Experience by virtual tour on the website here, , is a memorable one that formulates an actual visit. Over time, many bands of Apache were relocated to the reservation from their traditional homelands extending from Texas through New Mexico and Arizona into Mexico and California. We extend to you an invitation to our homeland and only ask that you come with respect to the lands, people and the traditional customs of our nation. The San Carlos Apache Reservation was established on November 9, 1871 is the worlds first concentration camp still existing to this day. Our story, is the American History come explore to meet the people and hear the stories first hand. Fine crafted items of adornment, burden baskets from world renowned artists, Apache Cradle Boards ornamental and full size available.

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Indian Wedding Blessing - Wikipedia

Apache indian customs

Apache religion and ceremonies. Explore Apache religion, wedding and burial customs, and ceremonies. Apache Creation Story. Western Apache Chiricahua, White Mountain, Northern and Southern Tonto, San Carlos and Cibecue Apache Religious Beliefs. The Chiricahua Apache name for their main spirit or God is. Links the storied past of the Apaches with contemporary times. It covers modern-day Apache culture and customs for all eight tribes in Arizona, New Mexico, and Oklahoma since the end of the Apache wars in the 1880s. Highlighting tribal religion, government, social customs, lifestyle, and family structures, as well as arts, music, dance, and contemporary issues, the book helps readers understand Apaches today, countering stereotypes based on the 18th- and 19th-century views created by the popular media. It demonstrates that Apache communities are contributing members of society and that, while their culture and customs are based on traditional ways, they live and work in the modern world. Also available as an Ebook This book meets the goal of the series it is a part of—to provide resources for students and the general public that will help abolish the harmful stereotypes and images of Native American peoples that have fostered adverse political and legal decisions against them and to show how these tribes are surviving and indeed thriving in current society.

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Apache Indians - Religion - Native Americans in Olden Times for Kids

Apache indian customs

Apache Religion. In ancient times, the Apache believed that supernatural beings lived with them. They could not see them, but they were there. They believed spirits also lived in mountains and in streams and under rocks. Spirits were everywhere. They could even be found inside a rock. The Apache were very clean. The Apache Indians originated in northern Canada but later settled in the Plains states and the American Southwest. They call themselves Inde or Nide, meaning "the people." Their lives are rooted in deep spiritual practice and they use song and dance to communicate with the creator. The Apache believe their god created them and all parts of the natural environment. The Apache believe that their ancestors are guiding forces and are living among them as part of nature, such as rocks, trees, wind or mountains. They treat nature with dignity and respect out of reverence for their ancestors. Purposes of the dances include healing, requesting rain and celebrating the puberty of young girls.

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