Politics and the English Language - Wikipedia

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Politics and the English Language - Wikipedia

Orwell essay on english language

Politics and the English Language" 1946 is an essay by George Orwell that criticises the "ugly and inaccurate" written English of his time and examines the connection between political orthodoxies and the debasement of language. The essay focuses on political language, which, according to Orwell, "is designed to make. George Orwell was a man of unflinching idealism who made no apologies for making his convictions clear, be they about the ethics of journalism, the universal motives of writing, or the golden rules for making tea — but never more so than in his now-legendary essay “Politics and the English Language,” which belongs among history’s best advice on writing. Originally published in 1946, Orwell’s masterwork of clarity and conviction is newly published in with a selection of more than fifty timeless, timely essays from such formidable minds as Virginia Woolf, Vladimir Nabokov, John Dewey, Andrew Sullivan, and Zadie Smith. Decades later, Orwell’s essay endures as a spectacular guide to writing well — an increasingly urgent reminder that language is first and foremost a tool of thought which, when misused or trivialized, does a tremendous cultural disservice to both reader and writer. Much like clichés poison language through their contagiousness, Orwell argues that our carelessness with the written word is propagated, in a meme-like fashion, by our relinquishing of deliberate thought in favor of lazy, automatic replication. His “catalogue of swindles and perversions” remains a remarkable clarion call for mindfulness in writing. Most people who bother with the matter at all would admit that the English language is in a bad way, but it is generally assumed that we cannot by conscious action do anything about it. Our civilization is decadent, and our language — so the argument runs — must inevitably share in the general collapse. It follows that any struggle against the abuse of language is a sentimental archaism, like preferring candles to electric light or hansom cabs to airplanes.

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Orwell essay on english language

George Orwell's essay, Politics and the English Language, first published in 1946, talks about some “bad habits”, which have driven the English language in the wrong direction, that is, away from communicating ideas. In his essay he quotes five passages, each from a different author, which embody the faults he is talking. NEW Episodes Monday at am It seems like "traditionalist" neo-Nazi organizer Matt Heimbach has reached the end of his ignoble career, facing accusations of vicious assault in the wake of a sordid affair with the wife of his top deputy, who is also Heimbach's wife's stepfather. (Good work on keeping the family sacred, Heimbach clan.) That sto ...…NEW Episodes Monday at am Did you hear the one about the Jewish gal who was married to a Nazi? Is the connection that so many journalists and analysts have made between these men's movements and the Alt-Right justified? How about the sorrowful dad who disowned his Nazi son after Charlottesville? In this episode, Manischewitz & Mendacity red-pill you on Warren Farrell, an early prop ...…NEW Episodes Monday at am Liberals and leftists hated Andrew Breitbart in life and cursed him in death. Or the one about "edgy" podcasters who went from making dark Holocaust jokes to humorlessly advocating for a second Holocaust? In this episode, (((Joe))) & J ...…NEW Episodes Monday at am Once a prominent figure only in the wilderness of right-wing internet culture, Richard Spencer has become the smug public face of the so-called Alt-Right. "F*ck him," wrote Matt Taibbi in Rolling Stone immediately after Breitbart's death was announced in March 2012. He can lay at least a partial claim to originating the phrase "alternative right" itself, and he has been the subject of numerous profiles since Trump's election ...…NEW Episodes Monday at am Manosphere. "I couldn’t be happier that he’s dead." But even Taibbi had to concede that Breitbart's public humiliation of then-Senator, no ...…NEW Episodes Monday at am While hardly a counter-cultural figure himself, the late Samuel Francis was enormously influential in fringe right-wing movements at the turn of the century, helping to popularize with his writing both an explicitly racialist view of civilization and a "Gramscian" strategy - after the theories of Italian Marxist An ...…NEW Episodes Monday at am In this full-length introduction to Season Two, Joe & Josh explain why they've devoted this next batch of episodes to discussing the Alt-Right, that tangle of ugly political and cultural phenomena that has been explained, attacked, and analyzed to death by all quarters of the media in the past two years. What else ...…NEW Episodes every Monday at am BONUS! We talk about what we did well, what we could have done better, and what's on tap for next season. Let us know what you think: essayquestionspodcast@NEW Episodes every Monday at am The normalization of mass shootings is perhaps the most horrifying aspect of modern American life - which is saying something. Belief that an alien religion threatens to destroy our way of life. In this episode, Joe & Josh delve into the minds of of the men and boys who commit such crimes, with the help of Andrew O' Hagan's masterful synthesis of their self-serious, self-pityi ...…NEW Episodes every Monday at am Populist anger. To say that "The Paranoid Style in American Politics" by Richard Hofstadter is just as relevant today as when first published in 1964 is a painfully obv ...…NEW Episodes every Monday at am In this sister episode to last week's discussion of "Avant Garde and Kitsch," Joe & Josh continue their less-than-plausible attempt to present themselves as highbrow snobs by tackling Dwight Mac Donald's "Masscult and Midcult." While the tech-driven atomization of American culture has largely destroyed the hom ...…NEW Episodes every Monday at am What is art? It's a perennial, impossible question, one made even more difficult to answer by the fact that so many people tend to bristle - in America especially - at the idea of making quality distinctions between serious art and mere entertainment in the first place.

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Orwell's 5 greatest essays No. 1, 'Politics and the English Language.

Orwell essay on english language

Nov 8, 2013. For anyone interested in the politics of left and right -- and in political journalism as it is practiced at the highest level -- George Orwell's works are indispensable. This week, in the year marking the 110th anniversary of his birth, we present a personal list of his five greatest essays. The winner and still champ. ' Politics and the English Language' is widely considered Orwell's most important essay on style. Style, for Orwell, was never simply a question of aesthetics; it was always inextricably linked to politics and to truth.' All issues are political issues, and politics itself is a mass of lies, evasions, folly, hatred and schizophrenia. When the general atmosphere is bad, language must suffer.' Language is a political issue, and slovenly use of language and cliches make it easier for those in power to deliberately use misleading language to hide unpleasant political facts. Bad English, he believed, was a vehicle for oppressive ideology, and it is no accident that ' Politics and the English Language' was written after the close of World War II.

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Politics and the English language in 2017 | The Spectator

Orwell essay on english language

Jul 24, 2017. A correct version of Orwell's essay can be found ​here​. By George Orwell. Most people who bother with the matter at all would admit that the English language is in a bad way, but it is generally assumed that we cannot by. Now, it is clear that the decline of a language must ultimately have political and. Most people who bother with the matter at all would admit that the English language is in a bad way, but it is generally assumed that we cannot by conscious action do anything about it. Our civilization is decadent and our language — so the argument runs — must inevitably share in the general collapse. It follows that any struggle against the abuse of language is a sentimental archaism, like preferring candles to electric light or hansom cabs to aeroplanes. Underneath this lies the half-conscious belief that language is a natural growth and not an instrument which we shape for our own purposes. Now, it is clear that the decline of a language must ultimately have political and economic causes: it is not due simply to the bad influence of this or that individual writer. But an effect can become a cause, reinforcing the original cause and producing the same effect in an intensified form, and so on indefinitely. A man may take to drink because he feels himself to be a failure, and then fail all the more completely because he drinks. It is rather the same thing that is happening to the English language.

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George Orwell: Politics And The English Language - Essay Questions (podcast)

Orwell essay on english language

Nov 8, 2017. If anything, though, Orwell is better known for his views on language. His celebrated essay Politics and the English Language 1946 expounds six “elementary rules” for good writing. These include the maxims, repeated in many style guides since, to never use the passive voice if y An there be a political writer who has not fallen in love with George Orwell’s 1946 essay, “Politics and the English Language”? Part of its appeal is what’s appealing about all of Orwell—its directness and honesty, its plainspokenness, its faith, against all evidence, that human affairs can be conducted morally, its sense of being on the side of ordinary people, not of the sophisticated and powerful. The only people Orwell attacks by name in “Politics and the English Language” are two celebrated academics, Harold Laski and Lancelot Hogben, not the kind of minor-grade politicians and bureaucrats who would have made easy targets. “Politics and the English Language” begins as a lesson, and quite a good one, in how to write well (delivered in the form of an attack on people who write badly), and ends with the hope that better writing can engender a better society. What idea could be more attractive to writers than that what we do, if improved along the lines Orwell suggests, can improve not just our readers’ experience of our work, but the lives of everybody?

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George Orwell Politics and the English Language Mental Floss

Orwell essay on english language

Aug 14, 2008. In 1946, George Orwell published an essay in the British literary magazine Horizon, arguing against poor usage of English by modern writers. In the essay, Orwell cited five examples of "the English language as it is now habitually written." The examples are almost hilariously hard to follow. The first is. Somewhere or other Byron makes use of the French word longeur, and remarks in passing that though in England we happen not to have the word, we have the thing in considerable profusion. In the same way, there is a habit of mind which is now so widespread that it affects our thinking on nearly every subject, but which has not yet been given a name. As the nearest existing equivalent I have chosen the word ‘nationalism’, but it will be seen in a moment that I am not using it in quite the ordinary sense, if only because the emotion I am speaking about does not always attach itself to what is called a nation — that is, a single race or a geographical area. It can attach itself to a church or a class, or it may work in a merely negative sense, against something or other and without the need for any positive object of loyalty. By ‘nationalism’ I mean first of all the habit of assuming that human beings can be classified like insects and that whole blocks of millions or tens of millions of people can be confidently labelled ‘good’ or ‘bad’. But secondly — and this is much more important — I mean the habit of identifying oneself with a single nation or other unit, placing it beyond good and evil and recognising no other duty than that of advancing its interests. Both words are normally used in so vague a way that any definition is liable to be challenged, but one must draw a distinction between them, since two different and even opposing ideas are involved. By ‘patriotism’ I mean devotion to a particular place and a particular way of life, which one believes to be the best in the world but has no wish to force on other people. Patriotism is of its nature defensive, both militarily and culturally.

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Teaching Argument and the Rhetoric of Orwell's "Politics and. - jstor

Orwell essay on english language

In some part my essay might be thought of as a rejoinder to Carl. Freedman's 1981 "Writing, Ideology, and Politics Orwell's 'Politics and the Eng- lish Language' and English Composition." It could also be thought of as incorpo- rating John Rodden's 1991 "Reputation, Canon-Formation, Pedagogy George. Orwell in the. Eric Blair was born in 1903 in Motihari, Bengal, in the then British colony of India, where his father, Richard, worked for the Opium Department of the Civil Service. His mother, Ida, brought him to England at the age of one. He did not see his father again until 1907, when Richard visited England for three months before leaving again until 1912. Eric had an older sister named Marjorie and a younger sister named Avril. With his characteristic humour, he would later describe his family's background as "lower-upper-middle class." At the age of five, Blair was sent to a small Anglican parish school in Henley, which his sister had attended before him. He never wrote of his recollections of it, but he must have impressed the teachers very favourably for two years later he was recommended to the headmaster of one of the most successful preparatory schools in England at the time: St Cyprian's School, in Eastbourne, Sussex. Young Eric attended St Cyprian's on a scholarship that allowed his parents to pay only half of the usual fees. Many years later, he would recall his time at St Cyprian's with biting resentment in the essay "Such, Such Were the Joys," but he did well enough to earn scholarships to both Wellington and Eton colleges.

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The Books: A Collection of Essays, ‘Politics and the English Language’, by George Orwell | The Sheila Variations

Orwell essay on english language

Jan 10, 2009. If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out. And wouldn't you know it, the very first sentence of Orwell's essay runs Most people who bother with the matter at all would admit that the English language is in a bad way, but it is generally assumed that we cannot by conscious action do anything about it. Most everyone who knows the work of George Orwell knows his 1946 essay “Politics and the English Language” (published here), in which he rails against careless, confusing, and unclear prose. “Our civilization is decadent,” he argues, “and our language… must inevitably share in the general collapse.” The examples Orwell quotes are all guilty in various ways of “staleness of imagery” and “lack of precision.” Ultimately, Orwell claims, bad writing results from corrupt thinking, and often attempts to make palatable corrupt acts: “Political speech and writing are largely the defense of the indefensible.” His examples of colonialism, forced deportations, and bombing campaigns find ready analogues in our own time. Pay attention to how the next article, interview, or book you read uses language “favorable to political conformity” to soften terrible things. Orwell’s analysis identifies several culprits that obscure meaning and lead to whole paragraphs of bombastic, empty prose: : these are the wordy, awkward constructions in place of a single, simple word.

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Words and things Prospect Magazine

Orwell essay on english language

On the 50th anniversary of Orwell's essay, Politics and the English Language, Andrew Marr finds political English in good health—thanks, in part, to Orwell's warnings. Power and brutality still hide behind evasive language, but are now more likely to do so in corporate culture. Imagery: or ‘word-pictures’ includes: personification, metaphor, similes, sensory language, adjectives, etc. Any place the writer puts an image or picture in your mind - ‘we need a police force of children’. sensory language: touch, taste, smell, sights (colour, light, shape), sounds are used to create a vivid picture of the scene - to [increase whatever effect/theme the writer is trying to get across] Link this to sounds (sibilant, plosive, etc) wherever you can. Comment on if it’s a positive mood - light, bright, soft; or negative - dull, harsh, uncomfortable.‘the writer paints a negative picture of the scene with dull, depressing sensory language: ‘brown’ and thick, heavy words like ‘sludge’, ‘slop’ and ‘shriek’ which uses a sharp onomatopoeic sound to break, unpleasantly, into the mood.’semantic field or lexical field: a group of words referring to the same topic, e.g. This is most worth commenting on where there’s an interesting contrast, e.g. love described as ‘war’ - something unexpected which shows us a strange truth about love: it can be hurtful, violent, you can feel destroyed, etc. The sibilant sounds in ‘softly, sweetly, sickly’ creates a soft, gentle mood, which turns sinister on ‘sickly’ as the sounds flow across the line.

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Politics and the English Language Summary | GradeSaver

Orwell essay on english language

Politics and the English Language, the essay of George Orwell. First published April 1946 by/in Horizon, GB, London. Is a beautifully written language crime, though it pretends to lay down the law. Furthermore I just noticed that its final law is rather curious. Orwell begins with the unjustified premise that language is in decline – unjustified because while he viciously attacks contemporary cases of poor writing, he provides no evidence that earlier times had been perennially populated by paragons of literary virtue. He proceeds to shore up the declining language with style suggestions that, regrettably enough, have never turned a Dan Brown into a George Orwell. Customers who buy into Orwell's shit also buy Strunk and White, and further milquetoast simulacra of one or the other, so it's worth looking more closely at what he proposes. Let's start off in time honored Language Log style, by seeing how Orwell breaks his own rules.

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Don't be beguiled by Orwell: using plain and clear language is not always a moral virtue

Orwell essay on english language

May 14, 2017. Mentor and trustee Will Ferguson kicked things off last month by presenting on George Orwell's 1946 essay, "Politics and the English Language." Here's what he had to say about it Orwell's "Politics and the English Language" is probably my favourite essay. Writing is one of my great loves, and I have been. Coffee won’t help you to write a good essay, but we will. If you believe spending the last sleepless nights before the deadline with a cup of coffee in front of your PC will result in a good written essay, unfortunately, you are wrong, moreover, as the practice tells us – it’s approximately impossible. Nevertheless, such situations are usual if you are a student with unbalanced curricula. Do not worry about it anymore, as soon as right now you have an access to – a major essay writing service which is able to solve all problems you face writing essay. With our professional help you won’t have to worry about the lack of time, skills or energy anymore. Our experts are capable of working with any type and level of academic paper. Consider our professional essay help as something you really deserve. has already brought a brilliant academic success to every single client we had, so why don’t you just become one of those lucky ones?

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Politics and the English Language: An Introduction - Ethics & Public Policy Center

Orwell essay on english language

Politics and the English Language and Other Essays Paperback 9781849028363 George Orwell Books. 1: Orwell’s thesis is somewhat stated, but also implied. His thesis is that any effect can become a cause, such that something that starts as an aid for a different ailment may eventually become detrimental. 2: Orwell’s analogy of the cause and effect of alcohol abuse to the demise of lanuage in paragraph two is very effective. It shows a chain reaction, where the person starts drinking alcohol to combat a problem in their live, but then the alcohol eventually leads to more difficult problems. 3: In Paragraph 4, Orwell uses a simile to compare “phrases tacked together” to “sections of a prefabricated henhouse”. That shows how prose consists of words that aren’t necessarily chosen for their meaning, but instead just because it’s easy. In Paragraph 12, Orwell uses a similie to compare someone “choking” to “tea leaves blocking a sink”, which shows how the author knows what he wants to say, but sometimes he has too many “stale phrases” in his head. In paragraph 15, Orwell uses a similie to compare “a mass of Latin words fall upon the facts” to “soft snow”, which blurs the outlines, and covers up the details.

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George Orwell's: Politics and the English Language- Thesis and Analysis - SchoolWorkHelper

Orwell essay on english language

May 27, 2017. The ur-text nearly always invoked for purposes of comparison is George Orwell's essay Politics and the English Language 1946, with its diagnosis of a 'special connection between politics and the debasement of language'. Orwell's conclusion, back at the onset of the Cold War, was that political orthodoxy. In 1946 George Orwell wrote “Politics and the English Language,” an essay that is still quoted by writing teachers today. Such a phrase is an example of what Orwell decries. Without too much effort, we can also apply what it has to say to haiku, both the writing of these little gems and to criticism about them as well. We say these poems are “precious” because we have received that language from others. Marlene Mountain says that “haiku is not a port in a storm.” Haiku is not a cute and precious gem, and as long as we view it that way, we are stuck not just in stale language but stale thought, and the haiku we write will not rise into literature. Orwell wants us to find fresh thoughts about what we are saying and, if necessary, fresh metaphors. That doesn’t mean we have to make everything new, but to think freshly—or, as Jane Hirshfield has put it, to “make it yours.”Orwell begins his essay by presenting five convoluted passages of text where thought has been suffocated by needlessly complex and obscure language. He explores how the imagery is stale and how grasping at complexity leads to a lack of precision.

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George Orwell's Six Rules for Writing Clear and Tight Prose Open.

Orwell essay on english language

May 20, 2016. Most everyone who knows the work of George Orwell knows his 1946 essay “Politics and the English Language” published here, in which he rails against careless, confusing, and unclear prose. “Our civilization is decadent,” he argues, “and our language must inevitably share in the general collapse. About a month ago, I wrote a column about George Orwell’s novel “Nineteen Eighty-Four” and the recent controversy surrounding the NSA surveillance of millions of Americans. That piece elicited more reader response than any other I have published in this space, so today I am serving up a second helping of Orwell.“From a very early age, perhaps the age of five or six, I knew that when I grew up I should be a writer,” George Orwell recorded, and his life was one long preparation for the writing of his most enduring work, “Nineteen Eighty-Four.” But before that, in 1946, Orwell wrote “Politics and the English Language,” which has become the most reprinted of all English essays. In it he exposes the parlous condition of the English language and the prevalent diseases that afflict it: “Modern English prose consists less and less of words chosen for the sake of their meaning, and more and more of phrases tacked together like the sections of a prefabricated hen-house.”Orwell catalogs various types of rhetorical “swindles and perversions,” concluding that “the great enemy of clear language is insincerity. When there is a gap between one’s real and one’s declared aims, one turns as it were instinctively to long words and exhausted idioms, like a cuttlefish squirting out ink.” As an example of the kind of ink verbal insincerity can so easily spew, Orwell quotes a well-known verse from biblical Ecclesiastes: I returned and saw under the sun, that the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, neither yet bread to the wise, nor yet riches to men of understanding, nor yet favor to men of skill; but time and chance happeneth to all of them. Then the essayist presents a version of the passage with its life blood drained away and replaced by the embalming fluid of modern English style: Objective consideration of contemporary phenomena compels the conclusion that success or failure in competitive activities exhibits no tendency to be commensurate with innate capacity, but that a considerable element of the unpredictable must invariably be taken into account. The biblical passage contains 60 syllables, the “translation” 90. Yet which version, asks Orwell, seems fresher and more vivid? More telling, which seems closer to the kind of speech and writing we encounter in modern times? He states that “the decadence of our language is probably curable” and ends his essay by suggesting a number of remedies to help restore the language to a healthier state.

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Rationality and the English Language - Less Wrong

Orwell essay on english language

Mar 25, 2018. Yesterday, someone said that my writing reminded them of George Orwell's Politics and the English Language. I was honored. Especially. The second LL article cites a result that the use of passives in Orwell's essay is in fact well above the average found in a large sample of English prose. So whatever. "Politics and the English Language" (1946) is an essay by George Orwell that criticises the "ugly and inaccurate" written English of his time and examines the connection between political orthodoxies and the debasement of language. The essay focuses on political language, which, according to Orwell, "is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable, and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind." Orwell believed that the language used was necessarily vague or meaningless because it was intended to hide the truth rather than express it. This unclear prose was a "contagion" which had spread to those who did not intend to hide the truth, and it concealed a writer's thoughts from himself and others. In our time, political speech and writing are largely the defence of the indefensible. Things like the continuance of British rule in India, the Russian purges and deportations, the dropping of the atom bombs on Japan, can indeed be defended, but only by arguments which are too brutal for most people to face, and which do not square with the professed aims of political parties.

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Writers on Orwell's “Politics and the English Language” The New.

Orwell essay on english language

Jun 23, 2017. If you've ever thought of yourself as a writer, chances are that you have opinions about George Orwell's “Politics and the English Language.” First published in 1946. From glowing exaltations to severe critiques, I was curious what working writers had to say about the famed essay. I mined NYPL's Articles. George Orwell’s essay “Politics and the English Language,” begins by refuting common presumptions that hold that the decline of the English language is a reflection of the state of society and politics, that this degeneration is inevitable, and that it’s hopeless to resist it. This disempowering idea, he says, derives from an understanding of language as a “natural growth” rather than an “instrument which we shape for our own purposes” (251). As an instrument, language can be manipulated for various purposes. As Orwell will show, language can also manipulate those who use it unconsciously. He presents a list of corrupting habits that cause writers to think poorly and thus write poorly.

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George Orwell's Politics and the English Language Summary.

Orwell essay on english language

George Orwell's widely read essay 'Politics and the English Language' links the decline of the English language to the degradation of the political process. This lesson explores Orwell's arguments and his time-tested advice to writers on how to improve their writing. Mr Fangfoss is a rural tyrant who, when standing for the local council, limits his election address to a pithy eight words: ‘If elected, I will keep down the rates.’ No such brevity, alas, attends the 2017 manifestos of the UK’s three main political parties. The shortest of them — the Lib Dems’ is not that much shorter and took several minutes to download (for some reason it seems impossible actually to buy a party manifesto these days. No bookshop in my home city of Norwich was stocking any, and the local Labour councillor from whom I requested a copy of seemed puzzled that anyone should want one). Each is attractively produced, professionally laid out, and harbours a wide range of illustrations. Would anyone read them who was not absolutely compelled to do so? Sensitive literary types very often turn highly agitated in the presence of party manifestos. The ur-text nearly always invoked for purposes of comparison is George Orwell’s essay (1946), with its diagnosis of a ‘special connection between politics and the debasement of language’.

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How to Write: Lessons from George Orwell's "Politics and the English Language" - Qualia

Orwell essay on english language

The essay by George Orwell entitled “Politics and the English Language” was published in 1946, that is to say three years before his novel 1984. However, it was written in the same time frame as that political novel which, together with Animal Farm published in 1945 made Orwell famous and even a household name. One of George Orwell’s main concerns with capitalist, fascist, or communist societies was the ruthlessness they showed toward all other forms of government and towards any dissent of the people. Orwell pointed out that governments such as Stalin’s in Russia and Mao Tse-tung’s in China manipulated the masses, educating them through the media to do whatever the government wanted. Propaganda, the manipulation of words, was their major tool for brainwashing the people, just as it had been for Hitler in Germany. Their leaders tell them that the enemies want to kill them. Hitler’s words had hypnotized a nation and set Germans to harassing and killing Jews and other “non-Aryans.” Orwell said that nations respond to the language of their inconceivably foolish leaders because people are easily frightened. It is a fight of ideologies that will only end when one nation finally destroys the other. In we see this situation reflected in the three great powers that continually war with each other: Oceania, Eurasia, and Eastasia. Orwell said that language makes humans easy to control—control their language and you control the people. A simple example of that notion was brought home to me one day when I was talking to a young Chinese woman who told me that her dialect had no word that matched the English word for privacy. Privacy was a concept her parents didn’t understand.

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George Orwell Biography - A Biography of George Orwell

Orwell essay on english language

Can there be a political writer who has not fallen in love with George Orwell's 1946 essay, “Politics and the English Language”? Part of its appeal is what's appealing about all of Orwell—its directness and honesty, its plainspokenness, its faith, against all evidence, that human affairs can be conducted morally, its sense of. The thesis of this essay can be divided into two portions which co-exist throughout the essay and are frequently used to support each other. Orwell’s explains that modern English writers have a multitude of malicious tendencies which have been spread throughout all contexts of writing. He offers the opinion that these tendencies can be avoided if someone takes the time to do so. This will result in political regeneration, but must be done by all English writers not exclusively professional ones. Orwell latter goes on to assert that language corrupts thought and vice versa. The slovenliness of our language allows for foolish thinking, and this foolish thinking allows for slovenliness in our language. This cyclical process is often difficult to break because again bad habits provide us with very convenient and elegant sounding sentence structures. However as he stated early this course is reversible by all writers if they are willing to follow his six rules. The Intro of the essay asserts the notion that the English language has been disfigured by the human race and is on the residual decline as a resultant. Orwell attributes this downfall to politics and economic causes but goes on to outline his remedy to correct what he refers to as a “reversible” process. George Orwell goes on to cite passages from several prominent essays and articles, concluding on the similarities in their staleness of imagery and lack of precision. He criticizes the passages, stating that the incompetence and vagueness of such political writings desecrates correct English prose- construction. George Orwell begins by explaining the difference between newly invented and “dead” metaphors. Orwell rationalizes how many writers use extraneous verbs and nouns to pad sentences and create the illusion of symmetry. Orwell discusses the recurring tendency of bad writers to glorify shorter words with longer but not necessarily correct ones.

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